Property Australia | Planning to Prosper

This article was originally published by our cousins across the ditch, Property Council Australia, on 29 September 2020. It is being republished with permission to provide context to New Zealand’s COVID-19 recovery.

High priority, high impact changes to planning systems could deliver up to $5.7 billion a year in economic value and 39,200 jobs, finds a new report prepared by Urbis for the Property Council.

Three key takeaways:

  • Planning to Prosper was launched last week by federal minister for cities, urban infrastructure and population, Alan Tudge, and will be taken to state and territory ministers
  • Up to five recommendations for reform for each jurisdiction were assessed against benefits including quantity, timeliness, affordability, liveability and big economic impacts
  • Property Council chief executive, Ken Morrison, says National Cabinet plays an important role in kick-starting planning reform.

While state and territory governments have been making some progress on planning reform, embedded inefficiencies and uncertainty in planning systems continues to stifle new investment and growth in residential housing supply and growth.

A new report prepared by Urbis for the Property Council reveals how high priority, high impact changes to planning systems could deliver up to $5.7 billion a year in economic value and an additional 39,200 jobs.

Launching Planning to Prosper, Tudge pledged to take the ideas contained in the report to the next meeting of state and territory planning ministers.

The report identifies up to five planning reform priorities for each state and territory under three clear themes: more transparent rezoning processes; greater accountability of agency referrals; and simplifying assessment processes for simple proposals.

Each planning scheme was evaluated on its merits to identify the ‘quick wins’ for each jurisdiction that could be delivered within the next 12 months. The recommendations for reform are assessed against benefits such as quantity, timeliness, affordability, liveability and big economic impacts.

According to Residential Development Council president, Andrew Whitson, building new homes and communities can deliver a big economic dividend.

“Now, more than ever, streamlining planning processes will increase efficiency and help generate much-needed economic activity, accelerating the contribution of the private sector to our recovery, at no cost to government,” Whitson says.

One of the report’s authors, Urbis regional director Princess Ventura, says the report identifies the “low hanging fruit” that can turn state and territory planning regimes into “viable tools” that increase housing supply, enhance liveability, and boost national economic performance.

“As a country, we need to find more effective ways to tackle planning issues,” adds Property Council chief executive Ken Morrison.

“National Cabinet should consider National Competition Policy-style incentives to help make it happen.”

 

Download a copy of Planning to Prosper to learn more about the state and territory ‘quick win’ recommendations